Medical Education

SoME News

SoME News

 

From the Section on Medical Education


September 2016


Get INVOLVED:
Tell us your area of expertise and how you want to get involved in SoME: join/vote on working groups, write guidelines, help with social media and an education blog on current med ed literature and/or help us plan for the next international conference.

We'll help you, stretch beyond your area of comfort. Complete the survey!
Contact Section Chair, Alison Clay for more information.

What's happening in the SoME:
SoME Members attend San Antonio meeting to support medical education among all of the ATS committees Sept 15-16.

Work continues towards becoming an assembly, spefically working on projects! Learn more here

Webinars and Podcasts
This month's webinar was a discussion about how to Design Ultrasound curriculum for your fellowship, led Deepak Pradhan, MD, FCCP (NYU), Rosemary Adamson (UW) and Garth Garrison (University of Vermont). Click here to view!

Opportunities to publish your work are just around the corner!
Due by November 1: ATS abstract submissions are open! Please make sure to indicate your work is medical educational related, the instructions can be found by clicking here!

Annals of ATS medical education themed journal submissions will be due in early December, keep your eye out here for more information! 

Did you see this?

Have you seen these papers this month? Learn why our microbloggers think they are important and/or submit paper ideas here.

More than a Touch of Gray: Embracing Uncertainty in the ICU by Walter, JM. Singer, BD and Corbridge, T. Am J Resp Crit Care Med Pubished Online Aug 22.
Here's what our blogger says: Click Here

Fostering Student, Resident and Faculty Wellness to Produce Healthy Doctors and a Healthy Population. Academic Medicine 2016; 91: 1185-1188.
Here's what our bloggers says: Click Here


Learn More about becoming an Assembly

To become an assembly we must:

  1. Be a Section for three years
  2. Survey our Section to determine the desire to become an Assembly AND the name of the Assembly
  3. Write Goals and Objectives for the Assembly (and)
  4. Plan part of the international conference for the Assembly
  5. Complete a Section project. Examples of projects include writing guidelines or best practices, position papers, or systematic reviews workshop with workshop reports. Here are some sample projects currently underway at ATS:
    • Statements: Sleep curricular milestones or Implementation Science and its place in ATS
    • Workshops: Determining outcomes measures for assessment after critical illness
    • Systematic reviews: Organizational factors associated with ICU outcomes
    • Guidelines: NIV in acute respiratory failure

If you have idea for a project, submit them here


Did you see this?

Embracing Uncertainty in the ICU by Walter, JM. Singer, BD and Corbridge, T. Am J Resp Crit Care Med Published Online Aug 22.

In this well-written essay the authors describe the amount of uncertainty in critical care: from diagnostic uncertainty to therapeutic uncertainty. The authors raise the issue of how we teach trainees and other team members how to deal with uncertainty. After all, patient care is not a multiple-choice test with one clear answer. Even with all of our research and randomized controlled trials.

What is your curriculum for teaching and assessing comfort with uncertainty? Do you MODEL comfort with uncertainty? It may take only one sentence to open the conversation. Try it out today by clicking here!

Fostering Student, Resident and Faculty Wellness to Produce Healthy Doctors and a Healthy Population. Academic Medicine 2016; 91: 1185-1188.

Wellness has never been more important nor have there been so many opportunities for discussions on fostering wellness - especially with recent intern suicides, CLER visits for GME and the new learning climate questions on the AAMC graduate questionnaire. Those of us working in the ICU are particularly at risk.

This well written editorial discusses the important disconnect between our commitment to the health of our patients and our willingness to care for ourselves and each other.

The article also addresses faculty wellness, a topic that is often missed in conversations at the UME and GME level. Students and residents have duty hours. We don't. Wellness programs have been designed for students and residents and often missed for faculty. It's easy to become bitter then and hard to model wellness ourselves.

In the past, Stanford has had a wellness program that traded work hours for free house cleaning, laundry, extra meals. Cheaper than paying faculty hours, but sending an important message that they know how hard people work and that these other issues suffer.

What is your institution doing? What are you doing? Click here to leave us a comment!


July 2016


Last Reviewed: October 2017